CATANARCHY
Lyrics to a Lesbian Avengers protest song (transcript to come)

Lyrics to a Lesbian Avengers protest song (transcript to come)

All gay prisoners are political prisoners
70’s gay liberationist Allen Young

projectqueer:

Dean Spade—founder of the Sylvia Rivera Law Project and author of the new book, Normal Life—explains why we need to rethink the criminalization of large parts of the population. Spade’s book posits that the mainstream gay and lesbian movement largerly ignores systemic problems that harm our societies’ most marginalized. We need to “shift the conversation away from what the law says about us to what legal structures are doing to us,” Spade says. This is an excerpt of an exclusive two-part interview with Spade. To watch the full interview go to GritTV.org.

Trans* People Don’t Owe You:

foreverqueird:

loveontheroxx:

  • a coming out that is on your schedule
  • a coming out that makes it easier for you to take
  • a coming out that cherry-picks who knows according to your standards
  • a coming out that makes sense
  • a coming out that happens after certain transition milestones (HRT, surgery, therapy, etc.)
  • a coming out, period.

If you’ve never had to come out as anything, don’t tell me how I should’ve just sat someone down and did it or tell me other ways of how I should’ve done it. Even if you have, coming out is different for somebody else and it’s easy to have this idea of how it should have went down if you aren’t actually that person.

Especially if you’re straight or cis, please check your privilege and don’t tell me how to come out. You’ll just look like an ass.

Reblogged it before, and I will reblog it again.

Reblogged for my loving partner. You’re fantastic and you don’t owe anyone a goddamn thing, bb.

knowhomo:

*LGBTQ Issues We’re Interested In: Intersectionality

Sassy post is sassy—and makes some excellent points. As we at KNOWhomo headquarters   work toward keeping this a safe space for all members of the queer community, we continue to look for ways to find common ground for everyone interested in moving forward and making our world a better place, regardless of where we identify under the umbrella.

“…oppression operates in exactly such a way that even if it were the victims’ responsibility to end oppression, they wouldn’t be empowered to do so. The obligation (and power) always rests on the shoulders of the oppressor and those privileged by the oppression to end it.”

un-birthdayparties:

1) Be willing to confront instances of transphobia, cissexism, cisnormativity, cis-centrism, cis privilege and other forms of destructive bias where you find them (especially when you find them within feminist, activist or queer spaces), not through “call outs” or other toxic, self-defeating or abusive strategies, but by taking the opportunity for genuine discourse.

2) Don’t take a purely passive, reactive approach. Rather than waiting for things like someone saying something overtly cissexist, or a trans person bringing up a particular concern, be willing to proactively introduce trans issues, or trans-relevant aspects of broader issues, to feminist discourse. Likewise, proactively treat possible consequences, perspectives and concerns relevant to trans people and trans experiences as being not only significant but essential to all feminist issues and conversations.

3) Don’t assume any given issue is strictly, or even primarily, relevant to cis women. All feminist concerns are also transgender concerns, and vice versa. There are no feminist dialogues in which trans voices “don’t belong”, or to which trans voices have “nothing to add”. There are nosocial issues related to gender that don’t have consequences for trans people.

4) Proactively seek out transgender voices, perspectives and input on all issues, not simply what you regard as “trans issues” or situations where the value of such perspectives is immediately obvious to you. Come to us, rather than waiting for us to come to you.

5) Don’t treat the larger social conflict of gender as being dialectic or binary in nature. Don’t assume a unidirectional model of gender-based oppression.

via loversintransition, (original source is Natalie Reed).

<3 Ruth Elizabeth

When everyone holds their Trans* Day of Remembrance vigil this month, please don’t forget about CeCe McDonald. She’s in prison right now for fighting back & surviving a brutal attack that could have put her on this very list. We need to show support for our sister.
LOVE IT

LOVE IT

dykesanddykery:

WARNING for images of injuries at the link, graphic description of the assault below

An Oklahoma lesbian was attacked this week after months of anti-gay slurs and verbal harassment escalated into a brutal assault.

Kayla Elliott, 29, who has been caring for her sick father in the Oklahoma City suburb of Midwest City, said she has been harassed for months by a woman who resides in the apartment above her father.

But on Tuesday evening, those ant-gay slurs escalated into a vicious attack.

The woman, later identified as Camino Nicole Maxwell, allegedly initiated an altercation, calling Elliott a “dumb d*ke” who “looks like a man” and threatened to “Jack up you and your dad.”

According to Christina Garcia, a friend of Elliott’s, Maxwell took a swing and initiated a physical altercation. After the fight had been broken up, Elliott retreated from the confrontation and into her father’s apartment.

Later, after waiting inside for Maxwell to return home, Elliott ventured back out to retrieve a necklace that had fallen off during the fight, but before she could make it back to the apartment, Maxwell allegedly assaulted her with a knife, screaming, “I’m gonna kill you,” and “I’ll make you straight.”

After seeing the blood coming from Elliott’s head, witnesses called the police and separated the two.

OKC Pride is raising funds to help Elliott with expenses related to this attack, both medical and legal. If you wish to help, contact OKC Pride at (405) 466-LGBT (5428), or email info@okcpride.org.


Yup, we recruit.

Yup, we recruit.

dykesanddykery:

Vietnam Holds First Gay Pride Parade

The first gay pride parade in communist Vietnam took place in the capital Hanoi on Sunday with dozens of cyclists displaying balloons and rainbow flags streaming through the city’s streets.
Organised by the city’s small but growing Lesbian Gay Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) community, the event went ahead peacefully with no attempt by police to stop the colorful convoy of about 100 activists despite their lack of official permission.
“There was no intervention which is a good thing for Vietnam,” said one of the organizers, Tam Nguyen.
She said the parade had helped unite the LGBT community and raise awareness among “curious” onlookers, although many had no idea what the rainbow flag — an international symbol for LGBT groups — symbolized.
The cyclists attracted no hostility — and only a little attention — as they made their way down Hanoi’s busy streets.

dykesanddykery:

Vietnam Holds First Gay Pride Parade

The first gay pride parade in communist Vietnam took place in the capital Hanoi on Sunday with dozens of cyclists displaying balloons and rainbow flags streaming through the city’s streets.

Organised by the city’s small but growing Lesbian Gay Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) community, the event went ahead peacefully with no attempt by police to stop the colorful convoy of about 100 activists despite their lack of official permission.

“There was no intervention which is a good thing for Vietnam,” said one of the organizers, Tam Nguyen.

She said the parade had helped unite the LGBT community and raise awareness among “curious” onlookers, although many had no idea what the rainbow flag — an international symbol for LGBT groups — symbolized.

The cyclists attracted no hostility — and only a little attention — as they made their way down Hanoi’s busy streets.